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'Wireless step change' for monitoring

Developers of a new wireless monitoring system for the geotechnical and structures market say it offers a “step change” in the way data from instrumentation systems is collated and used.

Senceive chief operating officer Simon Maddison says the Flat Mesh system creates a mesh sensor network with nodes that talk to each other with selected points acting as a gateway for the collection of data. “Each node will establish where its neighbours are and communicate with them rather than act as a discrete point as conventional systems do,” says Maddison.

The other key difference between Flat Mesh and conventional monitoring systems is that it is wireless, which Maddison says makes the system quicker to install and easier to move as the project evolves. “It is very much a plug and play system,” he says.

The new Flat Mesh system is the second generation of the system to be developed by Senceive. Key developments include improvement in battery life from two to five years to 10 years, expansion of a network from 40 to 100 nodes and improvements in wireless range from 100m to 300m. “We will be expanding the range to 1km soon, too,” adds Maddison.

“The new version can also support multiple monitoring sensors from a single node.”

Senceive says it developed the new version of Flat Mesh as a result of feedback from users of the original system. Maddison believes the system provides a good alternative to automatic total stations with the benefit of offering more stable readings.

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