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UK’s deepest geothermal well drilled in Cornwall

The UK’s deepest geothermal well has been drilled in Cornwall by Geothermal Engineering at Rosemanowes Quarry near Penryn.

The 2.5km-deep shaft is part of a trial project, which aims to provide a cheap, quick method of delivering deep geothermal heat.

Geothermal well in Cornwall

The 2.5km-deep shaft at Rosemanowes Quarry, near Penryn, is part of a trial project

Dr Ryan Law, managing director of Geothermal Engineering, told GE: “The project is not designed to deliver power but will deliver around 0.5MW of heat, enough for 400 apartments or equivalent.

“The system is aimed at a very different market to large scale geothermal power plants.

“The aim is to install and connect directly to heat loads such as greenhouses, apartments, schools and swimming pools.

“It has been developed to test a new technology we have developed to deliver deep geothermal heat from single wells. It is not aimed at generating power.”

Geothermal Engineering said it will announce a number of other projects over the next 12 months.

Dr Law added: “Geothermal energy could be a significant contributor to the UK’s energy portfolio offering both heat and power. This project shows we can deliver deep geothermal energy in Cornwall and we look forward to developing further projects in the region.”

The project has been backed by the Department of Energy and Climate Change. Ed Davey, Secretary of State for Energy, said: “We need a broad base of renewable energy in the UK and I am pleased to see that a deep geothermal heat project is finally producing energy.

“This nascent sector could make a real contribution to renewable heat supply in the UK.”

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