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Thinking ahead would save money

Letters

I would like to post this open letter to all client organisations in the UK:

Dear Client It is now well documented that average civil engineering salaries in the UK have fallen to unacceptable levels. This has been caused mainly by the competitive way in which you procure services, usually aiming for the cheapest job.

I would like to point out that, by allowing this state of affairs to continue, you are shooting yourselves in the foot. Consider this simple reasoning.

Your project runs into difficulties, as the 'cheapest' consultants did not have the innovative solutions, techniques and motivation which the best engineers, now working in better paid professions, would have brought.

This causes delays and cost overruns, and as the consultant cannot afford the professionals who could solve your problems, you bring in expensive management consultants who promise that they can. Of course the people who take over are the same sort of high flyers you would have been employing originally, if you had been prepared to pay a sensible rate in the first place.

The net result is that your project turns out to be far more expensive than it could have been. You then do exactly the same thing for your next project. Can you not spot the rather obvious moral to the story?

AJ Burton (M), andyburton@email.com

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