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Steel | New Blue Book launched

Cresecnet hinckley

The Tata Steel Blue Book steel design guide has been fully updated and released as a more user friendly, web-based version with clearer tables.

What is it?

The Tata Steel Blue Book (formally Steel building design: Design data) has been the unofficial steel design manual for civil engineers for almost 20 years.

The new edition is fully web-based and provides resistances in accordance with Eurocode 3 together with the relevant UK and German National Annexes, as well as resistances to BS 5950.

Why has it been updated?

Tata Steel partnered with the Steel Construction Institute (SCI) to bring the old Blue Book into line with the latest codes and standards and to make it more user friendly. This new edition supersedes all previous versions.

Its new format allows designers to navigate on selected pages between various sizes, helping them find the correct member from Tata’s updated range of products.

SCI associate director Michael Sansom explains: “The updated Blue Book has better tables which are more flexible and consequently easier to use. Once a user selects a member size all the relevant information is immediately highlighted on the page, allowing designers to see the information quickly and easily.”

How do you use it?

The Blue Book includes Tata Steel’s entire structural hollow sections range and incorporates comprehensive section property data for key products Celsius and Hybox. It enables rapid selection of steel members in compression and bending, and data tables are also provided for combined bending and compression, web resistance and shear resistance.

Further information is provided on bolts, welds and relevant tolerances as well as a comprehensive General Notes section which details the background for the calculations.

What can I achieve?

Structural hollow sections are employed extensively in modern bridges and buildings. For example, hot-finished 355 Circular Hollow Sections are featured as internal and perimeter columns on the 12 storey Moorgate Exchange in the City where maximising internal space was a key requirement.

And the dramatic arched Seabraes Footbridge in Dundee shows tubular steel being used to good advantage, with 355 used extensively. The landmark structure crosses the main East Coast railway line and was installed over a very narrow time window.

Where do I find it?

The Blue Book is available free online. Click here.

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Readers' comments (4)

  • But it appears that open sections have all been removed...

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  • Tata Steel sold their "Long Products" business to Greybull Capital, which have then created British Steel Therefore all open sections are now no longer under the control of Tata, hence the removal from the blue book.

    Data for the open sections can be found here: http://www.steelconstruction.info/File:SCI%20P363.pdf

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  • It seems the online version of the complete SCI Blue Book (better known as the Steelwork Design Guide P363) is now here and includes open sections:-
    https://www.steelforlifebluebook.co.uk/

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  • Rather an oversight of the NCE not to note that open sections have been removed. This is arguably more newsworthy than any other aspect of this update.

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