Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Taylor Woodrow-Bam team completes huge jet-grouting job at Victoria Tube station

A mammoth jet grouting project has been completed at Victoria’s London Underground (LU) station.

Victoria jet grouting

The jet grouting took place while traffic continued to pass through the area.

Principal contractor Taylor Woodrow BAM Nuttall (TWBN), designer Mott MacDonald, and specialist contractor Keller installed 2,000 interlocking jet columns to enable safe tunnelling in the challenging ground conditions of water-bearing find sands overlaying London clay.

The construction programme was completed in 24 phases over a 34-month period while maintaining pedestrian and vehicle access through the area.

Building Information Modelling (BIM) was used to plan the positions of the jet columns around existing services.

Existing infrastructure, including sewers, water mains and London Underground tunnels dictated that the tunnels were constructed at shallow depths, with an axis approximately 10m below ground surface and clearances of less than 100mm from essential LU assets in places.

BIM jet grouting

BIM was used to plan the jet grouting.

Glenn Keelan, LU’s Victoria Station Upgrade programme manager, said: “We have never used the prescribed techniques in combination on the London Underground estate before.

“The delivery required continuous refinement and improvement, including the ‘leap of faith’ needed to apply BIM to ground treatment techniques.”

Steve Worthington, Keller’s project director, added: “The sequencing of work required careful planning and was driven by a risk review of each individual column. We reviewed criteria such as soil types, column inclination and proximity to sensitive structures to successfully install the network of columns to tunnel through.” 

Jet grouting is a construction process which improves the quality of the ground by using a kinetic energy jet. The jet mixes the in-situ soil with a cementitious material to create a homogenous ‘soilcrete’ column which reduces permeability and strengthens the ground.

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Please note comments made online may also be published in the print edition of New Civil Engineer. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.