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Soil analysis tool improved

Alcontrol has improved its contaminated soil analysis with the addition of an alarm system to its @mis online data reporting tool. As well as access to live laboratory results, the system allows an alarm to be set for any sample that exceeds a pre-specified contaminant level.

“Advance knowledge that samples have reached a threshold provides our clients with time to react,” says Alcontrol commercial director Simon Turner. “If a soil sample exceeds a threshold, decisions can be taken immediately regarding further treatment or stopping treatment.”

When @mis was first developed, it provided users with online access to their laboratory results. Alcontrol says this became popular in the market because it meant that users anywhere in the world could follow test results live. “This is important because many different management decisions hinge on the availability of such data,” says the company.

The system also allows users to view partial results as they are created. For example, if the first soil test result is high for hydrocarbons, it is clear that the sample is contaminated and further tests may be redundant or the choice of test refined, so the cost of lab testing can be reduced. This feature is a greater benefit when alarms can be triggered as soon as a threshold is reached, adds Alcontrol.

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