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CONTRACTS

SCOTT WILSON Mining is undertaking an environmental impact assessment for Canadian mining company Eldorado Gold, which is developing a 10M tonne per year mining project in western Turkey.

The Kisladag Project involves open pit mining of a volcanichosted ore with gold extraction using heap leach technology.

Scott Wilson is working closely with Turkish environmental consultants Encon as well as Eldorado's design team.

Turkey has seen a spate of recent gold mining projects and concern has been expressed about the impact on local communities and wildlife. Particular attention focused on the use of sodium cyanide to extract gold from the prepared ore material.

Although this reagent has a good track record in use, proving safe and environmentally shortlived in its toxic form, it is recognised that it presents a significant hazard that requires careful management to minimise risk.

As a result, Scott Wilson focused on three main aspects:

the environmental setting of the project; analysing and characterising the proposed technological process; and the concerns of communities and the various project stakeholders.

The EIA will also guide development of the project design.

Scott Wilson was able to address the latter requirement through use of a project team that comprised members with long experience of engineering solutions to environmental problems, including management of cyanide reagent as well as acid rock drainage and effective mine closure.

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