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Projects of the decade: GRONTMIJ

Opened in 2006 by then Transport Secretary Alistair Darling, Grontmij’s National Traffic Control Centre has transformed how the Highways Agency respond to traffic incidents.

Grontmij’s National Traffic Control Centre

Project description

The National Traffic Control Centre (NTCC) collects data from the roadside, assesses the impact of events and notifies drivers via variable message signs, traffic radio broadcasts, the Highways Agency’s website and a telephone service.

Challenges

The challenge was to install over 2,000 roadside sensors to current Highways Agency standards and then to build a real-time decision support system to collect and assess the incoming data from these sensors to determine the optimal information to disseminate to road users to help them manage their journey and reduce overall network congestion.

Grontmij’s role

Grontmij has been the Highways Agency’s technical advisor / employer’s agent on the project since 1997. Grontmij’s role includes overseeing all the work undertaken by the NTCC operator to provide, maintain and operate a national strategic traffic management and control centre for the entire English motorway and trunk road network.

Other parties

■ Client: Highways Agency
■ Serco
■ IBI

Start/finish

Grontmij involved 1997 - present. NTCC became operational in 2003.

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