Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Piletec aids precision piling at One Tower Bridge

Over 1000 rotary bored piles are currently being installed on the South Bank close to Tower Bridge in London by Miller Piling for Berkley Homes’ new residential and retail development, One Tower Bridge.

Poor ground conditions in the first 10m means that the project is not straight forward. Miller is using an ICE1423 vibrating piling rig hammer from Piletec to drive temporary steel casings through the challenging ground and into the underlying London Clay ahead of drilling for the rotary piles.

“Normally we’d screw the temporary casing into position with our rig,” said Miller Piling technical manager James Hayward. “But to maintain the programme, we are using the Piletec hammer to insert the casings before drilling them out and the hammer can service two piling rigs. Some of the casings being used here are 12m long, so we are using the hammer suspended from a crane.”

Miller will install a total of 1,100 rotary piles, with diameters varying from 750mm to 1.2m, to depths of up to 28m at the site. The casings are being lifted out soon after the concrete is poured.

“Using conventional methods, the process would have been laborious and slow,” said Hayward.

Miller started work on site in January and is expected to finish at the end of April, six weeks ahead of schedule.

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Please note comments made online may also be published in the print edition of New Civil Engineer. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.