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Nine bridges and a port still unrepaired after Cumbrian floods

Seven road bridges and two footbridges are still unrepaired and the Port of Workington still shows significant structural damage, six months on from devastating floods in Cumbria.

Seven road bridges and one culvert (Scarness) still need to be rebuilt or repaired, including Backbarrow Bridge and Bouthrey Bridge in South Lakeland; Low Lorton, Scarness and Little Braithwaite bridges in rural locations in Allerdale; and Workington’s two permanent road bridges, Northside and Calva.

Work programmes are in place for these bridges and they are anticipated to be repaired or rebuilt and re-opened this summer and autumn.

Connect Roads has confirmed it will attempt to repair the Calva Bridge rather than demolishing it as was previously expected. If successfully repaired, the bridge could be operational again by the end of this year.

“Cumbria’s priorities need to fit into the Environment Agency’s overall programme – but understandably local people have concerns.”

Cumbria County Council

Meanwhile, the Port of Workington still shows significant structural damage, despite being dredged and fully operational by mid January 2010. Ground investigations are ongoing before invitations to tender for the repair work will be released. The port anticipates proposals for works from contractors during June.

Navvies footbridge in Workington and Millers footbridge in Cockermouth also need to be repaired. Work programmes are in place for both.

The council also said that flood defences in Cumbria need to be reviewed in the long term and that flood defences installed in Carlisle following the 2005 floods did their job in 2009. “Cumbria’s priorities need to fit into the Environment Agency’s overall programme – but understandably local people have concerns that flooding could reoccur,” said the council.

The Environment Agency will begin a £100,000 feasibility study into the area’s flood defences this summer.

Cumbria County Council published a review of rebuilding progress since the floods, and remaining tasks, to mark the six month anniversary of the disaster.

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