Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Masters is a degree too far

Letters

It was interesting to read the contrasting views on the subject of the BEng vs the MEng degree (NCE 28 October).

As a BEng (Hons) graduate of 1997 who has worked for consultants, contractors and local authorities I can honestly say that I have used less than 25% of my university education in the course of my employment.

Yes, there are subject areas which have been invaluable, but most will only be of benefit if you follow a career path within certain specialist disciplines.

At the moment we have very low numbers of civil engineering graduates, and the majority of these are questioning the relevance of the ICE and the benefits of becoming chartered.

So why then are we as a profession demanding a higher standard than was required of the great and good within current membership, bearing in mind that 95% of the objectives which have to be achieved on a training agreement are done in the workplace after our formal education has been completed?

'CEng MICE' after your name does have a ring to it, but having to obtain a masters degree then completing a three year training agreement and professional review is too much effort just so your consultant employer can charge higher fees for your services.

Greg Riddle, MJ Gleeson Group, Haredon House, London Road, North Cheam, Surrey, SM3 9BS

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Please note comments made online may also be published in the print edition of New Civil Engineer. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.