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Nearly £250M in damage was caused to key infrastructure by this winter’s flooding, new research from the Local Government Association has revealed.

A snapshot analysis by the Local Government Association (LGA), which represents more than 370 councils in England and Wales, estimates local authorities have so far been landed with this huge bill after the devastation wreaked by storms Desmond and Eva.

cumbria floods

Cumbria floods

Nearly £250M in damage was caused to key infrastructure by this winter’s flooding, new research from the Local Government Association has revealed.

The LGA warns the final bill to councils could be much higher as local authorities are still assessing the full cost.

Worst hit have been Cumbria, which sustained about £175M in damage, Calderdale with £33M Northumberland with £24M and Lancashire £5M.

The LGA said the £130M already provided by government has been important in enabling local authorities and their communities to recover from the winter’s flooding havoc. However, the LGA warns councils will need more financial help from the government as the full cost of the damage emerges.

It also called for new flood defence funding announced in the Budget to be devolved by government to local areas, with councils working with communities and businesses to ensure money is directed towards projects that best reflect local needs.

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