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ICE Elect 2009: General candidates

Elections to ICE Council are once again underway; making it that time when members get their say on who should help lead their institution.

There are 9 vacancies to be filled. 5 of these are for general members (who do not represent any particular constituency). There are 17 candidates for these 5 general member vacancies.

NCE asked the candidates some questions on the burning issues. Find out their views in the following profiles.

Hakeem Adelakun

Hakeem Adelakun

Hakeem Adelakun

Associate, Colin Buchanan

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

While working as an Associate at Colin Buchanan, I liaise with and offer technical advice to various stakeholders on strategic multi-disciplinary projects. A recent example is detailed design of Woolwich Town Centre interchange in London.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the profession?

I would say it is the skill shortage among engineers to lead and manage major projects such as the Olympic village. This is due to no fault of engineers as such projects are few and far between within.

What do you consider to be the greatest innovation in the history of engineering?

The highlight for me was the introduction of Stone Mastic asphalt (SMA), an open texture material which is easily motorable. This reduces delay and improves programme period.

Which do you think is the most important infrastructure project currently underway and why?  

The Olympic village – one of the largest and most challenging projects that includes the regeneration of an entire area and encompasses different local authorities with different local issues. It is the largest in terms of scope and value.

What single thing would you want to improve about ICE?

I would like to improve communication at all levels within the organisation. Some improvements have been made but more is needed. 

What do you think ICE should focus on in influencing government?

While reading a recent NCE magazine the government chief scientist made a presentation to the ICE, which is the first ever, and a great stride in the right direction. Further improvements are needed in the area by forging more links and to change it into annual event. These links with the chief scientist office would force the government to take note.

How do you think all the engineering institutions could work more closely together?

I am aware that ICE members did not warm up to an idea of ICE and IMechE joining together. I believe that greater involvement of members from the initial negotiation and/or discussions would enlighten them to the benefits of such large umbrella.

What one impact do you think Council can have on how the Institution is run?

The council formulates strategies to set the future direction of the institution. The formulation of strategies should be carried out in consultation with members.

How would you persuade more graduate engineers to become qualified?

I am a delegated engineer and mentor young engineers in my current organization. I also belong to a charitable engineering organization where we assist and encourage professional engineers of the future.

How would you promote the value of CPD?

CPD is extremely important to engineers and the professional community as a whole. New inventions are introduced daily and every engineer would need to keep abreast of these developments. One of the ways of improving CPD among practicing engineers is by introducing engineering competitions in higher learning UK institutions. The ICE could then encourage organizations to involve their staff in mentoring of students.

 

John Armitage

John Armitage

John Armitage

Associate, Gifford

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

Coordinating the design of structures on site for the M25 J12-15 Widening and T5 Spur.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the profession?

Addressing the demographic time bomb by ensuring effective transfer of skills and knowledge to the younger generations of engineers.

What do you consider to be the greatest innovation in the history of engineering?

Concrete – life would be quite difficult without it! 

Which do you think is the most important infrastructure project currently underway and why? 

I’d love to say High Speed Two, but for now Crossrail.

What single thing would you want to improve about ICE?

Ensure it is relevant and an essential part of professional life for all members, not just the regular attendees.

What do you think ICE should focus on in influencing government?

Communicating the value that engineers can bring to enhance all aspects of life. 

How do you think all the engineering institutions could work more closely together?

Informally and at a local level – we have had excellent joint meetings at branch level in the South. 

What one impact do you think Council can have on how the Institution is run?

Keeping a clear focus on the main aims of the Institution – promoting engineering excellence in all that we do. 

How would you persuade more graduate engineers to become qualified?

Ensuring that professional qualification is an integral part of career development, and not just an add-on – companies and clients need to value it. 

How would you promote the value of CPD?

CPD needs to be part of our professional life, not a bureaucratic exercise – ICE must facilitate as many means as possible for engineers to develop skills.

 

Richard Ashley

Richard Ashley

Richard Ashley

Professor, Sheffield University

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

Working as scientific adviser to the House of Lords inquiry into water management in 2005/6. The final report received the second greatest media attention in history and it gave me an insight into how Government works and how to set about changing bad practice.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the profession?

It is helping society worldwide to prepare for and adapt to climate change and the uncertainty it is bringing. We may have a lot to learn from the uncertainty that people in developing countries face daily that leads them to live in more flexible and, hence, resilient ways. In our developed society we have allowed the community to expect a risk-free future and we have to change that perception.

What do you consider to be the greatest innovation in the history of engineering?

Although ‘sanitation’ was not discovered by an engineer, the ensuing change in life expectancy by decades, following engineers’ responding in partnership with lawyers and other professionals, has had the greatest impact on the lives of everyone in the developed world. It is a pity we have not extended this to the rest of the world.

Which do you think is the most important infrastructure project currently underway and why?  

The Thames Tideway sewer tunnel is an example of great traditional engineering and is repeating the feat of Sir Joseph Bazalgette. However, the massive carbon footprint in construction, energy use when operational and the lock-in to the use of the tunnel for 100 years, is an option that future generations will come to regret, despite what the Mayor of London thinks. This is a test case for civil engineering and is an opportunity to start to do it better.

What single thing would you want to improve about ICE?

Great George Street is too remote for many members. Although regionalisation is an unqualified success, more effort should be made to engage members who rarely if ever get to Westminster. I would like to see more invitations to members to participate in special meetings. A rota system could be introduced so that batches of members are invited to such events in sequence without charge. This could help to promote a sense of inclusion and collegiality at the heart of the Institution.

What do you think ICE should focus on in influencing government?

Tackling climate change and the short-term culture in Government that does not allow this to be addressed seriously. Climate change uncertainty problems are of far greater importance than either terrorism or the economic slow-down and could potentially be catastrophic. We need to keep voicing our professional concerns, both as an Institution and as individuals. In terms of the developing world, it is important to bring essential services and infrastructure there, as in many parts of the world the impacts of a changing climate are going to be far greater than for us.

How do you think all the engineering institutions could work more closely together?

We know that Government is more impressed if they can get information from a single consensual source. It is therefore important that the institutions develop agreed protocols for working better together to do this. Here the media are important especially in attracting public attention; and by commissioning investigations together the institutions could regularly release information and messages about poorly (and well) performing parts of Government and other elements of our society.

What one impact do you think Council can have on how the Institution is run?

Council appears to sit behind the DG, at least in NCE reports. The President has a high profile, but Council is not very visible. It might help the above actions if Council were to become more engaged in direct activities that, for example, interact with Government.

How would you persuade more graduate engineers to become qualified?

With the economic downturn this may be easier as qualifications should make members more employable than those not qualified, opening up more opportunities and choice in career path.

How would you promote the value of CPD?

There has never been a time since the earliest days of our profession when it has become so important to build capacity. To build technical and infrastructural capacity that is as sustainable and resilient as possible needs professionals who are as personally developed as possible. Schon’s treatise that we learn by doing requires us to engage in novel and at times, risky, solutions. We need new multi-disciplinary skills and CPD can help us all to develop the capacity to take measured risks and to sustain our capabilities over time.

 

Elena Browne

Elena Browne

Elena Browne

Senior materials and asset engineer, Halcrow

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

Working in high profile expert witness cases.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the profession?

Sustainability. Addressing the conflict between the industry and the environment.

What do you consider to be the greatest innovation in the history of engineering?

The wheel.

Which do you think is the most important infrastructure project currently underway and why?

Crossrail. Crossrail will make travelling in the region easier and quicker. It will reduce crowding on London’s transport network and deliver substantial economic benefits in London, the South-East and across the UK.

What single thing would you want to improve about ICE?

Communication between ICE and its members.

What do you think ICE should focus on in influencing government?

On diversity issues in science and engineering to help encourage more women into engineering.

How do you think all the engineering institutions could work more closely together?

Annual conference between all the engineering institutions to discuss current issues.

What one impact do you think Council can have on how the Institution is run?

Encourage increased member engagement with all initiatives through better advertising.

How would you persuade more graduate engineers to become qualified?

Communicate and increase the awareness of the benefits of being qualified.

How would you promote the value of CPD?

By advertising in NCE and journals.

 

Chris Burton

Chris Burton

Chris Burton

Associate director, Halcrow

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

I have been lucky to have been part of engineering teams that have completed infrastructure projects all over the UK. I bore my wife regularly with their stories as we travel around.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the profession?

Addressing the issues which climate change is bringing and finding the right solutions whilst trying to provide society with the infrastructure and energy that it wants.

What do you consider to be the greatest innovation in the history of engineering?

Canals. They opened up transportation options that previously did not exist and presented great opportunity.

Which do you think is the most important infrastructure project currently underway and why? 

In 2012 Britain will be showcased to the world by the Olympic and Paralympic games. I can’t think of a better opportunity for the engineering and construction industry to show the world what it can achieve and how it can provide sustainable solutions, leaving long lasting benefits in local communities.

What single thing would you want to improve about ICE?

The ICE is its members. It must ensure that it serves the members and communicates with them to the best of its ability.

What do you think ICE should focus on in influencing government?

There are a number of issues currently at the forefront of people’s minds. As a profession we are showing government what we can offer. We must ensure that whilst we can recognise the problems we are able to identify the solutions as well.

How do you think all the engineering institutions could work more closely together?

This is best served through the Engineering Council who have recently moved to revitalise their collaborative effort. However this must not be a substitute for appropriate dialogue at every level.

What one impact do you think Council can have on how the Institution is run?

By ensuring diligent governance and appropriate accountability prevails. OK, that’s two.

How would you persuade more graduate engineers to become qualified?

By convincing them that professional qualification through the ICE is a mark of achieving a standard of excellence that they can retain for the rest of their career. For most that’s a ‘no-brainer’.

How would you promote the value of CPD?

Ask a question of the individual. “If a layman seeks the advice of a professional engineer how do they ensure that it is the best possible and how can this be demonstrated?” As individuals we should always seek to improve ourselves and when we answer this question in our minds the value of CPD becomes very clear.

 

Victor de Kosinsky

Victor de Kosinsky

Victor de Kosinsky

Independent consultant

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

Educating and training world class young civil engineers

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the profession?

Attracting bright young people to civil engineering

What do you consider to be the greatest innovation in the history of engineering?

I should think electrification. Electric power helped spur economic development, transport, computing, design and communications.

Which do you think is the most important infrastructure project currently underway and why?

Dam building in China – considering its magnitude and environmental impact

What single thing would you want to improve about ICE?

On-line members’ directory

What do you think ICE should focus on in influencing government?

Sustainable and environmentally safe energy and infrastructure

How do you think all the engineering institutions could work more closely together?

Promoting interdisciplinarity and shared CPD

What one impact do you think Council can have on how the Institution is run?

Interdisciplinarity and feedback from a range of fields in the profession

How would you persuade more graduate engineers to become qualified?

I believe the developing shortage of qualified engineers will sooner or later persuade more graduates to become qualified

How would you promote the value of CPD?

CPD is simply imperative for our survival in the profession and in society. The educational system should embrace the vision of lifelong learning so that people from their very young age get used to continuous learning and updating.

 

Huw Edwards

Huw Edwards

Huw Edwards

Project wide commissioning manager, TfL

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

Bringing the East London Line Project to the brink of Commissioning into an Operational Railway.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the profession?

Retention of the best resources.

What do you consider to be the greatest innovation in the history of engineering?

Craneage.

Which do you think is the most important infrastructure project currently underway and why?

Crossrail, due to the scale and breadth of benefits it will bring.

What single thing would you want to improve about ICE?

Understanding of its worth, amongst the silent majority who remain disengaged.

What do you think ICE should focus on in influencing government?

The Infrastructure Planning process

How do you think all the engineering institutions could work more closely together?

Produce single view on key themes, without getting side-tracked into merger discussions.

What one impact do you think Council can have on how the Institution is run?

Council needs to ensure that the needs of the membership, and not just the London based membership, remain sufficiently high up the priority lists, in HQ decision-making.

How would you persuade more graduate engineers to become qualified?

Employers to give greater levels of responsibility, to newly professionally qualified engineers.

How would you promote the value of CPD?

CPD should be meaningful, not just a ‘tick in the box’ exercise, and should be provided in an environment that leads to satisfying career development with commensurate financial reward.

 

Sandra Forte

Sandra Forte

Sandra Forte

Project manager, Mouchel

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

Standing on top of a newly constructed bridge in south Leeds knowing that I had been part of the team that had made it happen. It was my first experience of the end result and an absolutely fantastic feeling.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the profession?

Currently I believe our biggest challenge is to maintain momentum in this difficult economic time.

What do you consider to be the greatest innovation in the history of engineering?

Water treatment systems. I don’t know of anything that has done more to transform the quality of life for those of us living in societies with these systems. For those living without, the consequence and daily struggle for survival are widely known.

What single thing would you want to improve about ICE?

Membership engagement. From my experience, a lot of our members pay an annual subscription, receive a weekly NCE magazine but have little more involvement than that in the ICE. I’d like to investigate ways to involve members more in the events, activities and opportunities that are available both regionally and nationally.

What do you think ICE should focus on in influencing government?

As civil engineers, we have the opportunity to improve quality of life for millions of people, through the every day decisions that we make. I believe that we have a responsibility to influence government to increase the importance of sustainability and a low carbon economy.

How do you think all the engineering institutions could work more closely together?

I think a good starting point would be if all the engineering institutions could establish some core development objectives for those working towards a professional qualification. Employers could then offer shared training opportunities and local institution branches could offer more joint events.

What one impact do you think Council can have on how the Institution is run?

Council represents a cross section of all ICE members who share a common goal to continuously improve the Institution and how it is run. The variety of backgrounds represented on Council will ensure that the Institution remains current and up to date on the needs of its members.

How would you persuade more graduate engineers to become qualified?

Get them early! We need to be motivating graduates as they first walk in the door helping them to map out their route to professional qualification. It’s so much harder for people to get on top of things if they’ve let a couple of years go by before starting.

How would you promote the value of CPD?

CPD is everything that we learn that improves our knowledge and ability to do our jobs. Consider the flip side; no CPD equals no development, no learning, no progress.

 

Ed Gardiner

 Ed Gardiner

Ed Gardiner

Rail systems design manager, Carillion

What has been the highlight of your career so far? 

Seeing the first Eurostar test train run into the new St Pancras International Station.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the profession?

Climate change and reducing our carbon footprint.

What do you consider to be the greatest innovation in the history of engineering?

The arch.

Which do you think is the most important infrastructure project currently underway and why?  

Trans-European High Speed Rail Network: it creates a step change modal shift to a low carbon footprint transport system.

What single thing would you want to improve about ICE?

Its ability to influence government policy

What do you think ICE should focus on in influencing government?

Creating a cross party strategic sustainable infrastructure programme.

How do you think all the engineering institutions could work more closely together?

As at present: joint events and activities where appropriate.

What one impact do you think Council can have on how the Institution is run?

Fully involve the Regions in shaping policy.

How would you persuade more graduate engineers to become qualified?

Verbal encouragement, support during training and development, and lead by example.

How would you promote the value of CPD?

Verbally encouraging graduates and colleagues, and leading by example

 

Bill Grose

Bill Grose

Bill Grose

Director, Arup

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

One of the highlights of my career has been my work on the new London Olympic Park, a hugely challenging opportunity to lead a diverse planning and design team to deliver infrastructure designs to a very tight programme. It’s been hard work, but focusing on people relationships and equality & inclusion has been rewarding.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the profession?

To ensure that we have the ability to change fast enough, both personally and institutionally, to adapt to the new societal and business demands on us. Right now, it is crucial that we get heard in Parliament and Whitehall, and that we take a leading role in addressing sustainability.

What do you consider to be the greatest innovation in the history of engineering?

There have been so many innovations: the wheel, the arch, and computers spring to mind, but I think I’ll opt for clean water supply, which has probably had the greatest impact on public health across the world.

Which do you think is the most important infrastructure project currently underway and why?

Crossrail is clearly going to be incredibly important to the economy over the next 10 years, but I think that the new Olympic Park is going to be so important in terms of social and environmental benefits in East London, and will also demonstrate that it is possible to build facilities to stage a Games that prove to be a responsible, sustainable infrastructure investment.

What single thing would you want to improve about ICE?

I would like to improve the ICE’s relevance to young and diverse civil engineers. The institution needs to be seen as more relevant to our newer members, addressing their concerns about society and the environment as well as salary and career development.

What do you think ICE should focus on in influencing government?

The ICE should focus decision-makers on the value to the UK of long-term (10 years+) planning and investment in critical infrastructure.

How do you think all the engineering institutions could work more closelytogether?

The institutions could work more closely by identifying areas of common interest and where concerted action is needed, whilst recognising the areas that don’t overlap. Many outside the profession do not need to understand the various engineering disciplines and institutions, a more unified “branding” could be presented.

What one impact do you think Council can have on how the Institution is run?

By proactively giving support, advice, feedback and direction to the Director General, who is responsible for running the ICE day to day. Council should set the strategic direction, and provide supportive challenge to the ICE’s staff.

How would you persuade more graduate engineers to become qualified?

By doing even more to encourage graduate members to see the value and relevance of ICE to their careers, their job satisfaction and remuneration.

How would you promote the value of CPD?

The value of CPD has to be encouraged in young members and prospective members at the beginning of their career, when they are forming their thoughts and values. CPD has to be made affordable and accessible for those people as well as of visible benefit to their training and development.

 

Jonathan Hegan

Jonathan Hegan

Jonathan Hegan

Retired (formerly chairman of RPS)

What has been the highlight of your career so far? 

Becoming Senior Partner of Kirk McClure Morton, Consulting Engineers.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the profession?

Attracting the brightest young people into the profession and providing them with sufficient stimulus to retain them.

What do you consider to be the greatest innovation in the history of engineering?

Computers

Which do you think is the most important infrastructure project currently underway and why?  

The Olympic Games Complex. It will showcase our Civil Engineering expertise to the British people and to the World. It will provide the nation with world class sporting facilities and will revitalize a neglected, deprived part of London.

What single thing would you want to improve about ICE?

Make CPD compulsory for all practising Civil Engineers.

What do you think ICE should focus on in influencing government?

Make them aware of our broad range of expertise available to advise on measures to mitigate the effects of Climate Change.  Impress upon them that such measures will create opportunities which would help the economy to recover. Under the circumstances encourage them to appoint a national Chief Engineer,

How do you think all the engineering institutions could work more closely together?

By having a common goal of helping the country (and the world) to reduce “greenhouse gas“ emissions.

What one impact do you think Council can have on how the Institution is run?

Give more autonomy to the Regions.

How would you persuade more graduate engineers to become qualified?

Being qualified will give them a recognized status as a professional Engineer and therefore afford them more opportunities within their chosen profession.

How would you promote the value of CPD?

CPD will maintain up to date Engineering and Management knowledge for our members. It will motivate each of our members to pursue a career of life long learning, which can only be to the benefit of themselves and the profession.

 

Brian Holden

Brian Holden

Brian Holden

Associate, Arup

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

Being able to develop the enthusiasm I have for civil engineering towards influencing the fabric of our society through my projects that include energy, water, waste and transportation elements.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the profession?

Apart from the obvious, climate change, it would be the skills time bomb.   Striking the balance between the perceived erosion of core technical competences of graduate engineers and raising of the importance of engineering technicians within the profession.  

What do you consider to be the greatest innovation in the history of engineering?

Artificial Intelligence: this will be the next significant step up in engineering – in the past 10 years I have seen ink on tracing paper replaced with virtual 3D city modeling that is integrated with transportation, environmental, movement analysis programs.  There is a bridge in Castlefield, Manchester that would not have been designed and built if not for computer analysis.  Once the Turing Test has been overcome then the benefits for society and our profession are boundless.

Which do you think is the most important infrastructure project currently underway and why?  

Anyone that addresses the key areas tackling climate change and a move towards sustainability – with an increasing number of people in the world living in cities then addressing urbanization and the benefits that come from energy, water, waste and transportation projects delivered by civil engineers are important.

What single thing would you want to improve about ICE?

I would want to improve (albeit it is underway) the ICE internet portal.  We said… ‘when you understand civil engineering you see the world differently’. The Institution now has the opportunity to be accessed by all ages, all over the world, at anytime, in any language – let’s make the most of this.

What do you think ICE should focus on in influencing government?

There is the saying, ‘the hand that rocks the cradle rules the world’ and we all know the importance of the funder on all of our projects.  At a recent Council meeting the Government Chief Scientific Adviser, Professor John Beddington, identified that there are ‘no engineers in the Treasury’; surely something to reddress so as to maintain a steady and strategic infrastructure hand on the Treasury tiller.

How do you think all the engineering institutions could work more closely together?

The ICE is joining forces with other engineering bodies (ref NCE 21.5.9 pg29) – however with limited resources and funds, priorities must be taken between our core activities and discretionary activities. There are many good multi institutional initiatives that are worthy of the ICE involvement although should they take precedent over membership or regional activities? (the membership satisfaction survey suggests not)

What one impact do you think Council can have on how the Institution is run?

The ICE Council is the governing body of the Institution and represents all grades of the membership. Meeting five times a year the Council is ultimately responsible for governing and managing the Institution on behalf of its members; the day-to-day operation is the responsibility of the Director General. Therefore the one impact is voting on the decision papers that in turn direct the policy and set the direction of the Institution.

How would you persuade more graduate engineers to become qualified?

The general reasons for graduates not becoming qualified have not changed. However, the lifestyle of the graduate has changed dramatically with more demands put upon them.  Recognition of these changes in personal/financial demands can be made, although I understand that most will only sit their CPR when they have to.

How would you promote the value of CPD?

I have recently taken my platinum CSCS card as it is a requirement for site – maybe a demonstrable accredited CPD record for the past 3 years should be a tender requirement.

 

Bob Lark

 Bob Lark

Bob Lark

Professor, Cardiff University

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

If I have to select a single highlight then it must be to have been asked to be the Chairman of ICE Wales, Cymru. It is a real honour to be given the opportunity to represent civil engineers in Wales and I hope that I can now repay my colleagues in Wales by also serving on Council.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the profession?

It has to be Climate Change and I think the real challenge lies in how we adapt to what is the inevitable, irrespective of which prediction proves to be the most accurate. While we might argue what the extent of climate change might be, we can be sure that it will change. What we need is an infrastructure and policies that are resilient.

What do you consider to be the greatest innovation in the history of engineering?

 The development of resilient, cost effective, sustainable construction materials that have facilitated the progress of civil engineering. So more a series of innovations which are still ongoing with the development of self healing materials, UHPC, resilient steels, recycled materials and the revival of the use of readily available natural materials such as straw bales, lambs wool for insulation and rammed earth construction.

Which do you think is the most important infrastructure project currently underway and why? 

These days the most important aspect of any project is whether or not it constitutes a sustainable development. This should be the real measure of success. As such, perhaps the most important project is the ongoing maintenance of our current infrastructure. So often overlooked both in terms of funding and recognition it is vital element of our response to climate change and our quest for real sustainability.

What single thing would you want to improve about ICE?

The Institution’s engagement with its members. Without its members the ICE would not exist and as such it is vital that it listens and responds to their needs and wishes. While such demands can not always be met, the ICE must do more to engage with them, to explain its strategy and to gain the support of the majority for its policies and actions.

What do you think ICE should focus on in influencing government?

Too often our advice, if sought at all, is requested too late to have any real influence or impact. We need to ensure that we are at the heart of policy making in relation to infrastructure issues and we can only do this by working closely with government at all levels. The exemplar of the work done in the devolved regions with their National Assemblies should be a model for how this might be achieved.

How do you think all the engineering institutions could work more closely together?

Working together must be more efficient and if we are to have a real impact on government policy then we must speak with one voice. No one wants to lose their specific identity, but the opportunities for shared values and joint working have never been greater. Again, in my experience, collaboration at a local and regional level is excellent. We need this to be replicated in London and joint initiatives such as “Engineering the Future” need to be much more commonplace.

What one impact do you think Council can have on how the Institution is run?

Members of Council, as the democratically elected representatives of the Institution’s members, should ensure that the Institution does reflect and respond to the views and needs of its members.  As such, the primary impact of Council should be in influencing and approving policy and as the guardian of members’ interests.

How would you persuade more graduate engineers to become qualified?

By demonstrating to them the benefits of not just becoming qualified but also of positively engaging with the Profession and the Institution. I believe those who get the most from their careers are those who put the most in, particularly in relation to their commitment, and by engaging with the Profession their opportunities and rewards are limited only by their ambition.

How would you promote the value of CPD?

By making it mandatory and readily available!  Few would argue with the benefits or necessity for CPD but we must make it accessible to all. We need to be more innovative in our use of IT for the provision and easy recording of CPD and in enabling our members in the more far flung reaches of our Regions to actively engage with the professional institutions and their activities. 

 

Denys Morgan

Denys Morgan

Denys Morgan

Independent consultant

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

The privilege, during the 1990s, to be entrusted with management and delivery of one of the largest value public sector client programmes seen in Wales or the UK, then or since.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the profession?

To be equal to the twin challenges of sustainable construction, and reaction to climate change. If not forcibly led by construction professionals, delivery of both would seem elusive.

What do you consider to be the greatest innovation in the history of engineering?

Pursuit of Constructing Excellence principles through true partnership non-adversarial contractual arrangements – more cost effective delivery, with same numbers

Which do you think is the most important infrastructure project currently underway and why?  

For Wales, and all the UK, for its contribution towards low carbon and sustainable energy futures, the rapid construction of energy capturing/storage arrangements in the Severn Estuary. It would be tragic if this rare opportunity was allowed to slip, and/or the “doubters” and the negatives were permitted to hold sway over the “innovators” and the positives.

What single thing would you want to improve about ICE?

Its democracy! Enhancing the voice, influence and contribution of ICE members, and breaking down the perception, real and sometimes undeserved, of OGGS “remoteness”.

What do you think ICE should focus on in influencing government?

Consolidating what, to ICE’s credit, is emerging, and getting into the corridors of power in Whitehall and the Celtic Legislatures, to bring the influence of capable construction professionals directly before politicians, and their advisors, rather than being filtered through bureaucrats!

How do you think all the engineering institutions could work more closely together?

Working with those progressives, of good faith, in other bodies, and circumnavigating the change resistors, and doom mongers, of which there are too many! The Wales inter-disciplinary working model is one that has been proven to work well.

What one impact do you think Council can have on how the Institution is run?

For Council to fully recognize, and to fully embrace, the strengths to the overall ICE cause that devolution has provided. The other half of the same coin is to steadfastly resist the occasionally detected centralizing tendencies that any large organization will exhibit from time to time.

How would you persuade more graduate engineers to become qualified?

By “talking up” the role of the qualified Civil Engineer as a positive agent for change, progress and influence, embracing and leading multi-disciplinary working. Promotion of exemplars.

How would you promote the value of CPD?

Conscientiously pursued CPD testifies to the continuous improvement to which we must all aspire, at every stage of development throughout our careers, without exception.

 

Paul Oliver

Paul Oliver

Paul Oliver

Principal engineer, WYG

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

Being given the opportunity to act as lead designer for a new build landmark structure bascule bridge for a re-development scheme in Gloucester. Closely followed by acting as lead designer for the refurbishment of a 10 span railway viaduct supporting the South West Main line between Plymouth and Cornwall.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the profession?

To demonstrate the value that Engineers bring to Civilisation and hence gain the recognition due to the profession − ideally on a parallel with that given to Doctors etc.

What do you consider to be the greatest innovation in the history of engineering?

Design codes, where would we be without them as a guide to learn our craft and as a starting point to be innovative?

Which do you think is the most important infrastructure project currently underway and why?

Crossrail − big project, big money, high profile for Engineers!

What single thing would you want to improve about ICE?

ICE should be more accountable to all members including Graduates and Students with a better and more responsive focus on views and issues raised as well as implementing long term strategic plans. This would allow Council to be a more dynamic, faster re-acting forum and more relevant to the profession as a whole. If elected I would instigate a “direct line” approach to your local and general members of Council.

What do you think ICE should focus on in influencing government?

Particularly in these difficult times I firmly believe the future of Civil Engineering depends on the ICE continuing to raise the Governmental and public perception of Engineers, promoting and championing sustainable design, and supporting sensible, achievable, defined training and professional development objectives.

How do you think all the engineering institutions could work more closely together?

My professional experience has shown that Engineers must collaborate with other engineering disciplines and not work individually. It is imperative, within the ICE, to develop mutual ideas through collaboration within the ICE regionally, nationally and internationally as well as with other Professional bodies. We must build on the existing inter-institutional networking at all levels, initiate and participate in more cross disciplinary opportunities such as local evening meetings and local and national technical seminars.

What one impact do you think Council can have on how the Institution is run?

Council is wholly responsible for how the institution is run. We are not only accountable to the membership but to the general public when we act as Trustees of the Institution.

How would you persuade more graduate engineers to become qualified?

As a recently approved ICE SCE I know that the key to this argument is not only the financial but also the personal benefit.  However, the reasons to become qualified are, in the end, almost entirely personal.

How would you promote the value of CPD?

Younger Engineers already know the value of CPD. The key challenge is to reinvigorate the wider membership to this view. We all do it without thinking. The recent moves are to formalize the recording of these activities to prove we do it. It’s not necessarily about attending courses and structured learning.

 

Bharat Pandey

 Bharat Pandey

Bharat Pandey

Chief engineer, Butwal Power

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

The endurance of the engineering structures which I was involved in its design. I am impressed with those structures as how it is sustaining and functioning well during the actual test to it.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the profession?

To find out the proper solution of the problem and its well functioning to the post construction of the engineering project. Many engineering designs do not perfectly function during operation, therefore in order to design a structure which can expect to function well is the biggest challenge.

What do you consider to be the greatest innovation in the history of engineering?

To find the aesthetic beauty of the structure and its stability.

Which do you think is the most important infrastructure project currently underway and why?  

As in the context of my country the most needed subject is to construct the hydropower projects to fulfil the demand of energy crisis in the country. There is an enormous potential of the “Water Resources” through the “Himalayan Rivers”.  

What single thing would you want to improve about ICE?

The most important thing is to continual improvement in strengthening the quality standards of the engineering knowledge. There is a need to follow the upcoming new technologies which can update the prevailing system of engineering jobs.

What do you think ICE should focus on in influencing government?

ICE should prepare qualified engineers who can influence in the area of honesty, integrity and dedication by employing its engineers in government office.

How do you think all the engineering institutions could work more closely together?

All the engineering institution can agree to the same standard of the engineering principles and organizing a common forum from time to time.

What one impact do you think Council can have on how the Institution is run?

The council can impact on playing an advisory role by sharing its long experience in the field of engineering knowledge so that the institution can adopt the most suitable way which can lead the institution to fit in to the changing world.

How would you persuade more graduate engineers to become qualified?

The graduate engineers should be given the opportunity to practise their theoretical knowledge in the practical field by involving them in the engineering projects so that they become more understanding and confident in their subjects.

How would you promote the value of CPD?

In order to promote the value of CPD there has to be a proper action plan as to how  to achieve the objective. There must be a continuity of the task in the plan covering the complete topic in the CPD process.

 

Paul Steen 

Paul Steen

Paul Steen

Associate, Ramboll Whitbybird

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

The relationships that I have developed with colleagues in the profession while working on some wonderfully challenging projects.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the profession?

Continuing to introduce new, and evolve our existing, professional members to be trained to adapt quickly to emerging technologies. In particular to maintain our leadership of the global response to energy resources and climate change adaptation and mitigation.

What do you consider to be the greatest innovation in the history of engineering?

The creation of robust infrastructure networks that supply power, heat, water and telecommunications and remove wastewater.  We can learn from these innovations as engineering evolves to meet the challenges of the 21st Century.

Which do you think is the most important infrastructure project currently underway and why?  

The East Coast Transmission Network will remove a major barrier to renewable energy generation in the most productive parts of the UK and to help to secure the power supply to the south east bringing about an evolution of energy supply from fossil fuels.

What single thing would you want to improve about ICE?

Development of the restructured ICE to make the regions and expert panels deliver real value to members.

What do you think ICE should focus on in influencing government?

We need to actively address government and respond to its requests: as an expert witness, we must continue to develop relationships with individuals within government; and we must continue to develop a well argued and clear policy position on a wide range of subjects.

How do you think all the engineering institutions could work more closely together?

In many instances engineering institutions will be most effective working independently in their fields of expertise. The Institution must be clear on where we offer a unique perspective and if this requires us to work with others then we must set clear goals for these relationships and deliver.

What one impact do you think Council can have on how the Institution is run?

Council can drive the way members interact with the ICE ensuring that the Institution is run in the way that members want it to.

How would you persuade more graduate engineers to become qualified?

Publication of personal testimonies of the benefits that professional qualification brings and enhanced recognition of the qualities of professional engineers within employers in existing and emerging industries.

How would you promote the value of CPD?

CPD is a yearning for knowledge and a vision for its application. Looking at the future of engineering we will all need to adapt to serve ourselves, our employers and our clients best and CPD is vital to meeting new global social, economic and environmental challenges.

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