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Clear solutions

The UK’s ageing water infrastructure is urgently in need of replacement. Learn more about the proposed solutions at the Infrastructure Show’s Utilities Hub.

Water will be a key focus at the Infrastructure Show when the UK’s civil engineering community will congregate at the NEC, Birmingham for the latest news, technology and information from those involved in the construction, running and generation of water infrastructure. A seminar programme in the Utilities Hub will run across the three days and cover water treatment and the UK’s water infrastructure.

Waste water management


Annually, 32M. m3 of untreated sewerage is discharged into the Thames. The London Tideway project will see the construction of a storage and transfer tunnel nearly 35km long, as well as the upgrade of three waste water plants. It is intended to improve the capacity of London’s sewerage system and help prevent sewerage discharge into the River Thames. This ambitious £2.5bn project is due for completion in 2020. The Infrastructure show will hear about one of the largest updates to London’s creaking Victorian water infrastructure in over
150 years.

Water infrastructure

In the UK, there are over 396,000km of water pipes under our streets, many of which date back to the 19th Century, which need replacing.
As well as the old infrastructure needing replacement, new developments will require plumbing, all of which adds strain and cost to projects.
With the government’s spending review on the 20th October, cost efficiency, value for money and sustainability will be pushed to the forefront of contractors and water management firms.
The Infrastructure Show’s seminar programme will investigate innovative and sustainable solutions to the UK’s water infrastructure conundrum.
The show will feature five sector-themed hubs dedicated to roads, rails, airports, utilities and cities.
Thames Water has signed
up as client partner to the
Utilities Hub.

Seminars in the hub include:

  • Phil Stride, head of London Tideway Tunnels - The London Tideway project: the scale and scope of the engineering challenge
  • Michael Norton, managing director water, Halcrow - Sustainability in UK water infrastructure: new practices and innovations for water infrastructure
  • Stuart Crisp, business development manager, Concrete Pipeline Systems Association - Sustainable pipelines and their carbon footprint
  • Ian Barker, head of water, the Environment Agency - The effect of regulation on the market: Does regulation force or restrict innovation? What are the priorities and what challenges lie ahead?

The Infrastructure Show forms a major part of a new event, BEST (Built Environment Solutions and Technologies), which is replacing Interbuild Specifier. Building on the legacy provided by Interbuild BEST will demonstrate to the industry how to achieve best practice that minimises cost, increases efficiency and reduces environmental impact.
The Infrastructure Show is taking place at the NEC, Birmingham from 18-20 October. Exhibitors are continuing to sign up to the show thick and fast, and to date include Topcon, Vinci, Costain, EC Harris, Kosran, JDP, Lafarge, Macrete, Fisher Fixings, Celsa Steel, Apollo Cradles, RMD Kwikform and Ergon Structural Concrete.

  • Entry to the Infrastructure Show is free to those who register in advance using priority code ENCR at www.best-show.co.uk/infrastructure

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