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Black & Veatch wins Hong Kong airport water role

Aeroplane

Engineering consultant Black & Veatch has won a water management role using sustainability best practice in Hong Kong International Airport’s (HKIA’s) expansion, bringing its “World’s Greenest Airport” ambitions a step closer.

The design will include sustainable hydraulic and water treatment systems for the airport’s new three runway system, and will use smart technology to minimise energy consumption.

It will also reduce demand for potable water by recycling treated grey water and using seawater as an alternative source to cool water for air conditioning.

“Black & Veatch’s sustainable solution is designed to meet both current and future water demands while withstanding impacts of climate change due to rising sea levels and extreme weather conditions,” said Black & Veatch Hong Kong project director Stephanus Shou.

“In addition, innovations such as smart systems and intelligent pump controls will minimise energy use and help HKIA achieve its ‘World’s Greenest Airport’ initiative.”

A smart drinking water supply system will provide real-time monitoring to save on costs while compact technologies will be used to limit the footprint required for sewage treatment without sacrificing treatment efficiency.

The three runway system will be completed in 2024 as part of an expansion at Hong Kong International Airport.

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