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Institutions come together to address flood risk

A group of institutions, including the ICE, are working together to manage and mitigate flood risk across the built environment.

The group is made up of the ICE, the Royal Institute of British Architects, the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors, the Royal Town Planning Institute and the Landscape Institute.

At a recent meeting at the ICE, representatives from the bodies met and committed to work together to develop policy positions and act as a resource for the government and other key stakeholders on flooding issues.

A number of measures were agreed on to help facilitate inter-institutional working. These include producing a joint submission to feed into the government’s new floods and water bill, pooling policy ideas and initiatives via live weblinks, and jointly seeking to market and accredit appropriate training and CPD events to their members.

Each of these organisations has now made a commitment to work together to deliver coordinated messages that will advise and influence the government and the relevant professions

David Balmforth

From ICE’s flooding panel David Balmforth, who chaired the meeting, said: “We are all in agreement that there is a huge opportunity to make our towns and cities more resilient to the risk of flooding, but engineers, architects, landscape architects and planners will need to work together much more closely if these benefits are to be realised.

“Each of these organisations has now made a commitment to work together to deliver coordinated messages that will advise and influence the government and the relevant professions.”

The group’s first output will be a joint policy statement, which will be submitted to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, as part of its current consultation on the draft Floods and Water Management Bill.

 

Readers' comments (1)

  • Richard R

    Greater control over imposing surface-water attenuation at new developments will be necessary. I am sure some of these are slipping through the net, so-to-speak! This will force developers to create SUDS. Maybe, in the future, there will be a call for "Surface Water Treatment Works" where heavy surface water run-off can be harvested and returned to the consumer as a non-potable supply. This would obviously require huge investment, but in the long-run may benefit society. Just a thought...

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