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Institution hits the road

News

SUMMER ROADSHOWS are the ICE's latest strategy for extolling the virtues of the NEC form of contract.

Throughout July and August Thomas Telford, the commercial arm of the ICE, is to run 12 practical half-day roadshows around the UK, helping clients, consultants and contractors to make informed choices and give balanced advice when deciding which contract to use for a particular project.

The roadshows will set out to demonstrate that from the smallest of projects right up to the £86M Eden project in Cornwall, the NEC has proved that its intuitive approach is an effective and efficient project management tool.

Examples will show that the inherent benefits of the NEC, as stimulus to good management, flexibility and simplicity, can be applied as successfully to the smallest building project as to a multi-million pound, commercial project.

But how does the NEC compare to all the other various standard forms of contract and why should you use it?

The seminars will compare the NEC family of contracts with other construction industry standard forms such as the JCT, GC/Works, ICE Conditions of Contract, FIDIC, IChemE, and PPC2000.

Two roadshows per day will be run at six venues across the country, beginning on 17 June in Bristol and ending on 7 August in Glasgow.

INFOPLUS www. newengineeringcontract.com

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