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In the papers today - 19 September

Paul Wolfowitz, president of the World Bank suffered a setback yesterday after the bank's shareholders insisted that they would have the final say on implementing his flagship anti-corruption strategy.
The decision was a victory for European states and developing countries anxious to ensure that the policy is not applied in an arbitrary fashion by the bank's managementThe Financial TimesDeputy Chief Executive of Network Rail, Ian Coucher said this week that the financial viability of the country's rural railway lines could be transformed if the government agreed to introduce lighter, faster trains. This would require an easing of rules on trains' ability to withstand head-on collisions The Financial TimesGlasgow's first new river crossing in 30 years was opened yesterday, marking a new phase in the regeneration of the city's docks. The Clyde Arc, which links the north bank of the Clyde to the Pacific Quay media quarter, cost £20 million to build and has been nicknamed the Squinty Bridge because of its unusual architecture and diagonal span.At the ceremony, Willie Haughey, chairman of Scottish Enterprise Glasgow, said: 'Getting this bridge open on time and on budget is a key milestone in the regeneration of this part of the river.' However, the ceremony was disrupted by local residents who have been angered by the extension of parking restrictions elsewhere in the city. One protester was removed after he interrupted a speech by Steve Purcell, leader of Glasgow council. The TimesA Chemical applied to the bottom of boats used by holidaymakers is responsible for destroying 90 per cent of plants in the Norfolk Broads, a study has indicated. Tributyltin (TBT) wrecked the ecosystem in the Broads while turning the crystal-clear water a murky green, researchers concluded after analysing sediments. The TimesBurren Energy has accompanied top level management changes with plans to increase exploration in the Middle East, expand in India and target acquisitions. Founder Finian O'Sullivan is surrendering his chief executive role after admitting he had not been successful enough in developing the business. 'I haven't driven myself hard enough,' he said. The Daily TelegraphThe government, Transport for London and members of the London Assembly have welcomed a move by Lord Sterling of Plaistow to set up a regular river bus service on the Thames. The Daily Telegraph revealed yesterday that the former chairman of P&O is co-ordinating a major drive to ensure that a river service every 15 minutes between Putney and Greenwich is a legacy of the 2012 Olympics.Lord Sterling is already building an alliance of groups keen to make the service a success, from the owner of the Millennium Dome to the head of the London Olympics organising committee. A spokesman for the Department of Culture, Media and Sport said: 'Ministers want to see a lasting tourism legacy in London and across the UK from the 2012 Games. The Daily TelegraphBritain's first college course designed to stop the country's roads going to pot has been launched. Students on the three-week course are taught the latest techniques on how to deal with the ever-growing problem of potholes in roads and pavements. The course is being staged at Blackburn, Lancs - the town made famous for its small holes in the Beatles song, A Day in The Life. The Daily Telegraph Glasgow's first new river crossing in 30 years was opened yesterday, marking a new phase in the regeneration of the city's docks. The Clyde Arc, which links the north bank of the Clyde to the Pacific Quay media quarter, cost £20 million to build and has been nicknamed the Squinty Bridge because of its unusual architecture and diagonal span. At the ceremony, Willie Haughey, chairman of Scottish Enterprise Glasgow, said: 'Getting this bridge open on time and on budget is a key milestone in the regeneration of this part of the river.' However, the ceremony was disrupted by local residents who have been angered by the extension of parking restrictions elsewhere in the city. One protester was removed after he interrupted a speech by Steve Purcell, leader of Glasgow council. The TimesA Chemical applied to the bottom of boats used by holidaymakers is responsible for destroying 90 per cent of plants in the Norfolk Broads, a study has indicated. Tributyltin (TBT) wrecked the ecosystem in the Broads while turning the crystal-clear water a murky green, researchers concluded after analysing sediments. The TimesBurren Energy has accompanied top level management changes with plans to increase exploration in the Middle East, expand in India and target acquisitions. Founder Finian O'Sullivan is surrendering his chief executive role after admitting he had not been successful enough in developing the business. 'I haven't driven myself hard enough,' he said. The Daily TelegraphThe Government, Transport for London and members of the London Assembly have welcomed a move by Lord Sterling of Plaistow to set up a regular river bus service on the Thames. The Daily Telegraph revealed yesterday that the former chairman of P&O is co-ordinating a major drive to ensure that a river service every 15 minutes between Putney and Greenwich is a legacy of the 2012 Olympics. Lord Sterling is already building an alliance of groups keen to make the service a success, from the owner of the Millennium Dome to the head of the London Olympics organising committee. A spokesman for the Department of Culture, Media and Sport said: 'Ministers want to see a lasting tourism legacy in London and across the UK from the 2012 Games. The Daily TelegraphBritain's first college course designed to stop the country's roads going to pot has been launched. Students on the three-week course are taught the latest techniques on how to deal with the ever-growing problem of potholes in roads and pavements. The course is being staged at Blackburn, Lancs - the town made famous for its small holes in the Beatles song, A Day in The Life. The Daily Telegraph A major step in the construction of the showpiece stadium for the 2008 Olympics in China was taken when the interlocking steel superstructure that gives the arena it's 'Bird's Nest' shape was freed of its supports. The Independent

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