Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Hitachi to build up to nine new nuclear plants in UK

Hitachi is buying Horizon Nuclear Power from RWE and Eon paving the way for construction of nine new nuclear power plants in the UK. The transaction is expected to be complete at the end of November.

Two British companies, Babcock International and Rolls-Royce have signed memorandums of understanding outlining their intention to help Hitachi plan and deliver the programme. Hitachi will cooperate with other nuclear energy related companies around the world.

Hitachi president Hiroaki Nakanishi said: “Today starts our 100 year commitment to the UK and its vision to achieve a long-term, secure, low-carbon, and affordable energy supply. We look forward to sharing Hitachi’s corporate vision and nuclear business policy with the management and employees of Horizon.”

Following completion of the transaction, Hitachi said it will immediately work towards achieving licence acceptance under the Generic Design Assessment process as governed by the Office for Nuclear Regulation and begin working with UK partners on the future programme.

Hitachi construction programme

The Hitachi Horizon programme involves building two to three 1,300 MW plants at each of Horizon’s sites at Wylfa, Anglesey, and Oldbury, Gloucestershire, with the first unit becoming operational in the first half of 2020s. Hitachi endorses the UK government’s policy for promoting low-carbon society and will employ its Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) technology, which has already been licensed in other countries. Currently, there are four ABWRs in operation in Japan, built to time and budget.

Hitachi anticipates the creation of between 5,000 and 6,000 direct jobs at each site during the construction phase and a further 1,000 permanent jobs per site upon start of the operation of each site.

Preliminary estimates indicate approximately 60% by value of the first unit will be spent on locally sourced materials, personnel and services, with this rising for future units. Hitachi will invest in transferring its modular construction technology which underpins the build timetable establishing a module assembly facility in the UK.

Hitachi will make a significant investment in training engineers, construction teams and operating staff for the plants, and will work with its partners and with local colleges and universities to develop training programmes, which will create a strong and permanent base of nuclear skills in the UK that also have a global demand.

In partnership with the UK government, the devolved administration in Wales and local authorities in the Wylfa and Oldbury areas Hitachi will work towards ensuring that economic benefits flow to the local communities in which the plants will be located.

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Please note comments made online may also be published in the print edition of New Civil Engineer. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.