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Hillhead preview: On with the show

he UK construction industry will get its chance to see many of the new machines launched at Intermat on home soil next month, at the Hillhead plant show in Derbyshire. Margo Cole previews the event.

Among the big names exhibiting at Hillhead this year are Case, JCB, Liebherr and Doosan.

Case compliance

Case will have a range of Stage IIIB-compliant F-series wheeled loaders, C-series excavators and skid steers on static display, together with a CX370C crawler excavator and a 1021F wheeled loader in the live demonstration area.

The company will also be running a round of its popular Rodeo operator skills competition at the show, giving operators the chance to try out the latest mini excavators and T-series backhoe loaders.

Operators from all over Europe take part in these competitions, completing a variety of challenges against the clock.

Case experts will also be on hand to discuss finance, spare parts, service and maintenance back-up, along with the firm’s new telematics system.

JCB’s excavator focus

JCB’s stand will include a UK debut for the Stage IIIB-compliant 457 WLS – the largest model in its wheeled loading shovel range, as well as the upgraded JS360, JS260 and JS220 crawler excavators.

Two JCB machines are making their UK debut: the 44t R950 SME excavator and the new Mobilmix 2.5 concrete batching plant.

At the opposite end of its excavator line-up, JCB will be showing the 2.7t 8026 CTS compact, and one of its latest generation skid steer loaders Visitors to the Liebherr stand will be able to see the firm’s R964C SME litronic excavator, together with its biggest wheeled loader, the hydrostatic drive L586.

Two machines are making their UK debut: the 44t R950 SME excavator and the new Mobilmix 2.5 concrete batching plant – a container-mounted system primarily intended for use on large construction sites and civil engineering projects.

Doosan on show

Doosan Infracore will be showing a range of new equipment, including Doosan excavators, wheel loaders, articulated dump trucks (ADTs) and high capacity telehandlers, as well as Bobcat mini-excavators and compact loaders.

The Doosan DX520LC crawler excavator will form part of the static display, together with the firm’s flagship large wheel loader, the new DL550-3. The next model in the range, the DL450-3, will be in the demonstration area.

Working with the DL450-3 in the demonstration area will be the company’s new DA40 ADT, the largest model in the range.

Also on show will be the DT160 telehandler, and the Bobcat E26 mini-excavator.

Alliance appeal

Hillhead visitors will also be able to see products from manufacturers in the Construction Equipment Technology Alliance (CETA), which has three stands at the show.

The organisation was formed last year to promote the adoption of advanced products and services, by Halomec, MOBA Mobile Automation, GKD Technik and OnGrade.

Hillhead visitors will also be able to see products from manufacturers in the Construction Equipment Technology Alliance (CETA), which has three stands at the show.

Products on display include GKD’s excavator safe load indicators, Halomec’s weighing solutions manufactured by Loadrite, the MOBA-Matic digital levelling system for pavers, graders, milling machines and dozers, and the ZoneSafe system from OnGrade.

New products from CETA members include GKD Technik’s Incline Alert incline monitoring system for articulated dump trucks, mini-excavators, tracked and wheeled excavators, telescopic handlers, dozers and compaction equipment.

The system consists of an accurate and sensitive pitch and roll sensor and a display for the operator, and when the machine is close to tipping over, a visible and audible warning is triggered.

Digital reveal

Hillhead will also be the first opportunity for construction managers to see a demonstration of Halomec’s Loadrite “whole site solution”, an integrated system for managing and monitoring the output on conveyors and wheeled loaders and excavators on a site.

Each piece of plant transfers data, via a radio link, cellular modem or wi-fi network, to a central server, where it is consolidated and presented as powerful management information.

Moba will use Hillhead 2012 for the UK launch of a number of products unveiled at Intermat, including the MCA-2000, which is designed for vibrating compaction rollers working on asphalt or earthworks, and the MDS-2000 drilling system that helps contractors increase the accuracy of hole placement.

It is also launching the Easy Dig 2D entry-level system for users new to automated excavator control.

It is suitable for mini-excavators, tracked and wheeled excavators and backhoes, and is designed to improve productivity and safety in a wide variety of utility, civil engineering and bulk earthworks applications.

Hillhead will also be the first opportunity for construction managers to see a demonstration of Halomec’s Loadrite whole site solution.

OnGrade will show its new Site Zone proximity warning system (PWS), which produces an invisible detection zone around a machine.

If an individual, wearing a personnel transponder, enters the detection zone, the machine’s operator is immediately warned.

Sister company OnGarde will launch its rapid deployment CCTV tower, which can be operational within two hours of arriving on site.

  • Hillhead 2012 takes place from 19-21 June in Buxton, Derbyshire. For more information click here.

Allu’s trench repair solution

One piece of kit getting its official launch at Hillhead is the SureMix hydraulically bound mix machine from Allu, designed for repairing trench openings in roads.

Utility work can create a double problem for motorists: first there are traffic delays from the roadworks and then, in the months that follow, collapsing repairs provide an ongoing reminder of the work.

The issue has cost implications for highways authorities who have to repair the damage and for the environment from the disposal of excess spoil left over from the poorly compacted backfilling.

The conventional approach of using Type 1 material for backfilling is less than ideal on two counts: firstly, much of the excavated material is likely to end up in landfill and, secondly, if the material is poorly compacted then it will stay that way. Increasingly, highways authorities are turning to hydraulically bound mix (HBM) solutions, where the spoil is mixed with a cement-based binder before it is compacted it back into the trench.

Contractors are starting to use HBMs to prevent the subsidence problem, but many are trying to do the mixing at the side of the road, and the results are not always as good as they could be.

Ivan Rowe, Green Solutions

But the approach is not a panacea, says Green Solutions managing director Ivan Rowe. “Contractors are starting to use HBMs to prevent the subsidence problem, but many are trying to do the mixing at the side of the road, and the results are not always as good as they could be,” he says.

According to Rowe, the addition of the hydraulic binder guarantees that the material will consolidate, but the mix has to be homogenous in order to achieve the best results.

Rowe is currently putting Allu’s new SureMix machine through its paces at his Glasgow recycling base ahead of the official launch at Hillhead in June. The latest version – developed in conjunction with Clayton Engineering – offers higher performance than its predecessor, according to Allu director David MacLynn. “The previous model used a twin shaft for premixing, whereas the new version has five vertical shafts that make the mixing action more aggressive, enabling the machine to cope with wetter, stickier material,” he says.

The result of this re-engineering is an output of up 140t/hour and, according to Rowe, the mix control and batching capabilities mean that it also offers higher quality assurance of the output material too.

The new version has five vertical shafts that make the mixing action more aggressive, enabling the machine to cope with wetter, stickier material.

David MacLynn, Allu

URS principal consultant Jo Edwards, who works for the Zero Waste for Scotland initiative, says: “Using SureMix means that HBM becomes more of an engineered product and takes the production away from the side of the road. The process has real potential to meet the targets of Zero Waste for Scotland.

“HBM is not as widely used here as it is in England due to different standards, but use of HBM could avoid 30% to 40% of utility trench spoil being sent to landfill and will prevent settlement of repaired road surfaces too.”

MacLynn says that although the highways sector is the target market for the SureMix, the greater output of the new model will mean it could also be used in other applications, such as the remediation of contaminated land.

Allu SureMix

SureMix: The machine is said to be able to cope with wetter, stickier material

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