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Government 'cocks-up' renewables target say energy users

The government’s decision to commit to a 20% target for energy production from renewable sources was described as a “cock-up” according to director of the Energy Intensive Users Group, Jeremy Nicholson.

Nicholson was speaking at the CBI’s energy conference in London and said: “Either [Tony Blair] was badly advised or he did not understand the difference between energy and electricity.

“We will never hit [a] 20% reduction in emissions by 2020 – we are struggling to meet 2%,” he said.

Then prime minister Tony Blair signed-up to the EU’s targets in the closing days of his leadership in March 2007.

The UK government currently has a 30% target for renewable energy to form part of our energy mix. Nicholson said this target: “Would have to be reduced – the CBI has suggested to 25%, but I think less.”

Nicholson said the current policy was: “Delusional and utterly lacking in credibility.” He said that money raised from auctioning Carbon Credits under the European Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) should be ploughed into projects designed to reduce Carbon - such as Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS).

Shell’s manager for regulatory afairs, Lex Huurdeman said the price of Carbon was unlikely to rise until the next phase of the trading scheme, which begins in 2012, “When the cap [on sources that emit Carbon] comes down,” he said.

Nicholson said the UK climate change tax system was: “Crying out for reform,” as some taxes act as a disincentive to some low-Carbon schemes, such as new nuclear.

 

 

Readers' comments (1)

  • Where oh where is the Insitution in pointing out that the Government's position on renewables is hoplessly unrealistic.
    Electricity at 75GW is but 20% of UK energy (gas for heating is 40% and petrol/dieselalso 40%). To keep homes warm and vehicles on the road it would seem that the most likely substitute for CO2 producing gas & oil is cabon free electricity. Has the Institution given any thought to how we might move to having 20% (75 x5) = 75GW of carbon free electrical power by 2020?
    Why did it take someone else to suggest that this figure is almost certainly unachieveable?
    Sadly the Institution seems to have become a follower not a leader.

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