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Further Sussex landslip hampers rail repairs

An embankment collapse at Stonegate in East Sussex has brought the number of landslips on the London to Hastings rail line in the last six weeks to five.

News of the latest collapse came as Network Rail announced that the first deliveries of more than 10,000t of aggregate were being brought in to repair one of the two landslips between Battle and Robertsbridge.

There were also two landslips near Wadhurst in late December and buses are continuing to replace rail services between Wadhurst and Battle.

Full details of the repairs needed at Stonegate have not yet been announced but Network Rail has said that it will work 24 hours a day on the failures at Whatlington and Marley Farm between Robertsbridge and Battle.

“We have got a massive job on our hands to rebuild the line at Whatlington, with at least 10,000t of stone needed to rebuild the embankment, all of which will be delivered to site by engineering trains,” said Network Rail route managing director Fiona Taylor.

The aggregate will be used to reconstruct the embankment once a 300m sheet steel pile wall is constructed. A further 60m of piling and 3,000t of aggregate will be needed to complete repairs at Marley Farm.

Network Rail has said it hopes to complete the repairs at Whatlington and Marley Farm by the end of February.

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