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Flooding risk changes stadium plans

Plans have been recommended to raise Rotherham United’s new football stadium by more than 2m to protect it from flooding.

The £20M stadium on the site of the former Guest and Chrimes foundry has been highlighted as it is in a “medium risk” flood zone.

Raising the 12,000-seater venue, which is due to be completed next year, will involve importing an estimated 54,000m3 of material from sites such as Maltby Colliery.

Rotherham Council’s planning board is due to consider the application this week.

The Millers have been playing at the Don Valley Stadium in Sheffield for three years after failing to agree a deal to remain at former ground Millmoor.

Readers' comments (1)

  • This headline implies that flood risk was not thought about until late on. Is this really the case? There are also going to be new Civic offices development adjacent to the proposed site.

    http://www.rotherhamrenaissance.co.uk/flood_alleviation.html

    Phase 1 of a flood alleviation scheme was completed a few years ago, has the plans for Phase 2 informed the proposed stadium design? Could this headline have also read - "Stadium design reduces flood risk to historic town"

    Come on NCE journalists - please dig deeper and inform at a professional level of what has been done.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

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