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Flooding: Project compendium

Barhale

Norland Square Flood Alleviation Scheme

 

Norland Square Flood Alleviation Scheme

Project Description

Thames Water is hiring Barhale Construction to carry out essential work to reduce the risk of sewer flooding at 115 properties in the Holland Park area of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in central London.

The work at Addison Avenue and Norland Square involves connecting local sewers via a new 240m long 1500mm diameter on-line tank storage tunnel to a new combined Pumping Station in Addison Avenue. Barhale used an Akkerman machine to install the tunnel.

The work includes building 220m of 600mm diameter interceptor sewer, and a pumping station to house duty and standby pumps together with associated ancillary equipment. The two microtunnel drives were installed using Barhale’s Iseki machine.

Meanwhile flow from properties in Holland Road and Upper Addision Gardens are to be diverted to the existing Russell Road pumping station by provision of new gravity sewers. This calls for the provision of 80m of 600mm diameter sewer in microtunnel (Iseki), and 25m of 600mm diameter sewer in open cut.

Barhale Construction is Principal Contractor on the project, with responsibility for construction of the shafts, tunnels, pipework and pumping station.

Challenges

The high-profile location of the work required Thames Water and Barhale to maintain good relationships in the community.

This included discussions about the opening of the major new Westfields Shopping Centre nearby, with the local authority and TfL regarding highways, an archaeological watching brief required for work on Church Land, English Heritage, and local conservation foundations, residents and businesses.

This project team also had to overcome land, planning and political issues associated with the location of the pumping station kiosk and vent column within the grounds of St James’s Church, owned by The Church of England.

Fact file

  • Other parties: Thames Water designed the scheme.
  • Thames Water project manager: Prunella Khalawan
  • Thames Water lead designer: Richard Evins
  • Barhale site agent: Chris Smalley
  • Barhale contracts manager: Tom Hunter
  • Start / finish dates: November 2008-March 2010

£6.1M

Total project cost

20

Total number of employees on construction

115

Flooded outputs relieved by scheme

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