Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Design and build contractors sought for £500M Bank Tube station upgrade

Transport for London (TfL) has invited expressions of interest from contractors to carry out an up to £500M upgrade of Bank Tube station.

The Bank station capacity upgrade project will create a new ticket hall at surface level and includes the diversion of around 570m of the southbound Northern line running tunnel in the Bank area and the formation of a new southbound platform to the south-west of the existing platforms.

Work is expected to start in June 2013 and complete by the end of 2021.

TfL said it was going to market early to allow contractors to bring their skills and experience to bear on the project, and identify significant cost, risk, programme, and other benefits. It wants expressions of interest from contractors or consortiums able to take on the complete design, build and project management of the works, estimated to be worth between £250M and £500M.

The project at a glance

London Underground has developed the Bank station capacity upgrade project to an outline design stage to provide:

  1. An increase in the circulation area for the Northern Line platforms by constructing a 570m new section of the southbound Northern Line and transforming the existing southbound platform and some of the running tunnel area into a new concourse and passage area
  2. New large cross passages linking the newly formed concourse to the new southbound platform
  3. New passageways, stairways and escalators to link the northern line to other lines
  4. A new lift shaft with four high capacity lifts providing direct step-free access from NL platforms and concourse to a new ticket hall and street
  5. An improved secondary means of escape
  6. Necessary utility diversion and enabling works

 

It said London Underground was looking in particular to pre-qualify firms best able to take on its outline design and bring innovative ideas forward.

Innovations sought

The scope of innovation sought by TfL includes but is not limited to:

  1. Arrangement of underground works
  2. Construction site arrangement including land take, secondary sites
  3. Constructability, sequencing, logistics, traffic management
  4. Methodology and construction techniques
  5. Oversite development
  6. Optimum incentivisation for payment during the design and construction periods

Readers' comments (3)

  • CHARLES ROBERTS

    £500 million for the upgrade of one tube station? What is the return on capital for this obscene sum?

    Oh, but I forgot that this is London and Bank station is for the bankers who have already cost this country billions in bailouts!

    Surely this money could be better spent on infrastructure elsewhere in the country.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Lionel jones

    Charles
    Bank station is dangerously overcrowded, the adjacent stations are at capacity too, this upgrade is long overdue.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • CHARLES ROBERTS

    Lionel

    At capacity for how many hours each day. Two? Three?

    Perhaps we could start by reducing demand in the area by innovative pricing,crowd control, etc.for a fraction of £500 million; or if the demand is as great as you state, by charging the users more to fund this station upgrade. Why on earth should the taxpayer fund a sum of £500 million for one station serving a tiny part of central London?

    I cannot believe that any cost benefit analysis could show that the return on such ludicrous expenditure is worth while.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Please note comments made online may also be published in the print edition of New Civil Engineer. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.