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Dark clouds end water companies' drought panic

A run on water companies applying for drought permits in the south east may have been averted with recent increased rainfall.

In December the Environment Agency said that yearly rainfall levels across Cambridgeshire, Bedfordshire, Lincolnshire, Northamptonshire and West Norfolk, were at their lowest since 1921.

It granted Anglian Water a drought permit giving it permission to top up its reservoir from a local river until the end of March. More drought applications were expected to follow.

But the Environment Agency has now said that all regions received at least average rainfall in December. Industry body Water UK added that some water companies reported “well above average” rainfall.

However, it warned that some areas will need sustained rain for the next few weeks in order to avoid restrictions in the spring.

 

Readers' comments (2)

  • A disappointingly tabloid-style headline which doesn't reflect the sentiments within the article it covers:

    1. Were water companies "panicking" or simply taking prudent action to protect supplies in case of extended dry weather? There is no suggestion of panic within the article itself.

    2. Has a single month of above-average rainfall "ended" drought fears? As the article says, "some areas will need sustained rainfall for the next few weeks to avoid restrictions in the spring". Not quite ended yet, then?

    David Shore

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • A disappointingly tabloid-style headline which doesn't reflect the sentiments within the article it covers:

    1. Were water companies "panicking" or simply taking prudent action to protect supplies in case of extended dry weather? There is no suggestion of panic within the article itself.

    2. Has a single month of above-average rainfall "ended" drought fears? As the article says, "some areas will need sustained rainfall for the next few weeks to avoid restrictions in the spring". Not quite ended yet, then?

    David Shore

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

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