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Cable transport

Birmingham International Airport in partnership with Austrian firm Doppelmayr Cable Car is building a new people mover to transport passengers between Birmingham International rail station and the airport.

In a £10M design, build and operate contract, the old Maglev cars are being replaced.

Designer for DCC is Babtie, Fitzpatrick is the civils contractor and Siemens is working on the mechanical and electrical systems.

The cable-towed people mover will use the old 585m long reinforced concrete Maglev track. But higher loads imposed by the cables mean the columns need to be strengthened. This will involve carbon fibre plate bonding to the external face of the concrete columns where the track runs on radius. The track structure will also be modified to accommodate the installation of steel guide ways for the cables and car running rails.

Two sets of two car trains will carry 1,490 passengers per hour in each direction at speeds up to 10m/sec with a journey time of under two minutes between rail and air terminals.

Fitzpatrick's role involves demolition, new building construction, structural works to track and air terminal and construction of a new multimodal interchange at Birmingham International station. Work started on site in January and the service will be operational by spring 2002.

www.fitzpatrick.com

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