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Boom time for civils predicted

The infrastructure industry will grow by more than a third in the next four years, according to a closely-watched industry report.

The infrastructure industry will grow by more than a third in the next four years, according to a closely-watched industry report.

Construction Products Association (CPA) forecasts out this week said the sector would become the fastest growing part of the broader industry by 2015.

The CPA said new infrastructure work would rise by 6.8% to £14.1bn this year.

It predicted it would then surge by 9.5% next year; 11% in 2016; and a further 7.6% to reach £18.4bn in 2017.

Road output is expected to soar a whopping 12% this year as Highways Agency capital funding grows. Highways work will continue to increase through the forecast period, according to the CPA.

The rail sector is expected to grow strongly over the next three years, driven by Network Rail spending, Crossrail and the Thameslink programme. This will then flatten out in 2017 when work on the two major London projects comes to an end.

Electricity work will be driven by the nuclear decommissioning programme, supplemented by a new wave of offshore wind generation from next year.

Investment in water and sewerage work is expected to remain flat this year but start rising from 2015 as work kicks in on the £1.6bn Thames Tideway Tunnel.

Repair and maintenance work in the infrastructure sector is forecast to grow just 1% per year from now until 2017. Local authorities are expected to be financially constrained, and Network Rail’s maintenance budget is set to fall.

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