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Black & Veatch wins water treatment contract in Hong Kong

Black & Veatch has won the contract to design and oversee a large expansion project at Tai Po Water Treatment works in Hong Kong

The project involves constructing additional water treatment facilities, increasing the pumping capacities of the secondary raw and fresh water pumping stations and storage capacity of a service reservoir, as well as laying new fresh water mains. Construction on the project is scheduled to commence in 2010.

“This expansion will more than triple the capacity of the water treatment works, providing up to 800 million liters per day of reliable water supply to the people of Hong Kong,” said Vice President and leader of Black & Veatch’s Hong Kong water business Alan Man. “In addition, the Water Supplies Department estimates this project will create approximately 2,100 jobs in the local construction industry.”

The existing Black & Veatch-designed facility was completed in 2005 and sits on a steep hillside location. The company’s innovative design took advantage of the slope and height of the location, stacking the plant’s layout based on successive water treatment stages. In addition, Black & Veatch used space-saving technologies to ensure that planned expansions could be confined within the small footprint.

                                                                 

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