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Bachy starts piling on Reading rail upgrade

Piling for the third phase of Network Rail’s bridge upgrade work around Reading station is now under way to improve both rail and road capacity.

Bachy Soletanche is working on installing the CFA piles for BAM Nuttall to a design by Gifford for a new bridge over Cow Lane to the west of Reading Station that will allow capacity to be increased. Bachy has said that it expects to complete the work by the end of October. Redevelopment of Reading Station, which is expected to call for up to 4000 new piles, will start soon and will be completed in 2015.

The overall project involves widening the rail route with new lines and three new bridges to improve rail services for the commuter hub. In the previous two phases of work, Bachy used continuous flight auger (CFA) and rotary rigs to construct foundations for bridges at Caversham Road and Vastern Road.

The current phase of piling involves installing 93 piles for the new bridge that will widen the road under the railway to two lanes and remove height restrictions. Foundations for the new bridge will be formed of 900mm diameter CFA piles drilled to depths of up to 12.7m for the new bridge wing walls and anchor piles. Reinforcement cages for the western abutment are made up of 14.7m long 12XT32 bars and a 22.5m long central 63.5mm GEWI bar. 

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