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Atkins buys Florida's PBSJ Corporation for £177M

Consultant Atkins today agreed a $280M (£177M) deal to buy US-based infrastructure consultant and contractor PBSJ Corporation.

The firm said it will benefit from an increased US presence and from PBSJ’s long-standing relationships with highways authorities at both the state and federal levels.

Atkins chief executive Keith Clarke said the purchase would improve its environmental, transportation, building design and programme management disciplines.

This is an important acquisition for Atkins and forms part of our plan to grow our business through a multi-skill, multi-local strategy,” he said.

This is an important acquisition for Atkins and forms part of our plan to grow our business through a multi-skill, multi-local strategy.”

Keith Clarke, Atkins

The acquisition means the consultant will become a group with just over half of its revenue secured in the UK and around a third in the US. In a statement, Atkins said ageing infrastructure means the US market is “large with prospects for growth” and long term consultancy opportunities.

PBSJ is based in Florida and employs 3,500 professional, technical and support personnel. It offers engineering, construction management, architectural and planning services with a strong focus on transport projects.

The firm is ranked by Engineering News-Record as 28th among the top 500 design firms in the US and 50th among the top 200 US environmental firms.

PBSJ is employee owned and has more than 80 offices in the US, and in the year to 30 September 2009 had gross revenue of $799M (£506M). The acquisition was unanimously recommended by the boards of both firms.

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