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A36 closure planned for £2.3M stabilisation scheme

The Highways Agency has announced that a section of the A36 will be closed from early March for 16 weeks to enable a major ground stabilisation scheme to be carried out by Skanska.

The £2.3M work will focus on a 5km section of the route between Brassknocker Hill and Hantone Hill and aims to stabilise ground affected by fault movement and landslide activity below the route and repair damage to the road surface.

Ground stability issues were first noted in 2009 and further movement was recorded following resurfacing of the road in 2013 but planned repair work has been delayed several times. The HA has said the delays were due to specialist equipment not being available and also other road closures as a result of the landslide at Midford in February last year.

The work this spring will involve construction of 238m long bored pile wall, built in 17 sections, and formed from 13.5m long, 600mm diameter piles at 1.2m centres along the edge of the southbound carriageway with a pile cap to prevent edge failure.

According to an HA spokesperson, numerous slope failures have been recorded within the local geology historically and have been seen to affect the other parts of the A36 carriageway. “The current work is adjacent to the Dundas Aqueduct layby where a 150m long piled retaining wall section was constructed in 2002 to remediate persistent edge failures and pavement cracking within the carriageway,” she said. “Surveys had indicated a slow rate of creep movement in the adjacent embankment with an associated risk of more significant slip failures in the near future if left untreated.”

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